The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub

In the 21st-century marketplace, there is sometimes a longing for an earlier, simpler age, but the uneasy tension between giant and small retailers seems to have been a constant since the beginning. The Temple of the Muses, which was one of the first modern bookstores, was a mammoth enterprise, by far the largest bookstore in England, boasting an inventory of over 500,000 volumes, annual sales of 100,000 books, and yearly revenues of £5,000 (roughly $700,000 today). All of this made Lackington a very wealthy man—admired by some and despised by others—but London’s greatest bookseller began his career inauspiciously as an illiterate shoemaker.

Read more at the Source: The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub

Author: conniejjasperson

Connie J. Jasperson lives in Olympia, Washington. A vegan, she and her husband share five children, a love of good food and great music. She is active in local writing groups, and is an active member of the both the Northwest Independent Writers Association and Pacific Northwest Writers Association. Music and food dominate her waking moments. When not writing or blogging she can be found curled on the sofa, reading avidly.

3 thoughts on “The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub”

  1. Another wonderful bit of reading. Thank you.

    On Tue, Oct 11, 2016 at 7:44 AM, Edgewise Words Inn wrote:

    > conniejjasperson posted: “In the 21st-century marketplace, there is > sometimes a longing for an earlier, simpler age, but the uneasy tension > between giant and small retailers seems to have been a constant since the > beginning. The Temple of the Muses, which was one of the first mode” >

    Liked by 1 person

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