The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub

In the 21st-century marketplace, there is sometimes a longing for an earlier, simpler age, but the uneasy tension between giant and small retailers seems to have been a constant since the beginning. The Temple of the Muses, which was one of the first modern bookstores, was a mammoth enterprise, by far the largest bookstore in England, boasting an inventory of over 500,000 volumes, annual sales of 100,000 books, and yearly revenues of £5,000 (roughly $700,000 today). All of this made Lackington a very wealthy man—admired by some and despised by others—but London’s greatest bookseller began his career inauspiciously as an illiterate shoemaker.

Read more at the Source: The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub

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Author: conniejjasperson

Connie J. Jasperson lives in Olympia, Washington. A vegan, she and her husband share five children, a love of good food and great music. She is active in local writing groups, an editor for Myrddin Publishing Group, and is a writing coach. She is an active member of the both the Northwest Independent Writers Association and Pacific Northwest Writers Association, and is a founding member of Myrddin Publishing Group. Music and food dominate her waking moments. When not writing or blogging she can be found with her Kindle, reading avidly.

3 thoughts on “The Man Who Invented Bookselling As We Know It | Literary Hub”

  1. Another wonderful bit of reading. Thank you.

    On Tue, Oct 11, 2016 at 7:44 AM, Edgewise Words Inn wrote:

    > conniejjasperson posted: “In the 21st-century marketplace, there is > sometimes a longing for an earlier, simpler age, but the uneasy tension > between giant and small retailers seems to have been a constant since the > beginning. The Temple of the Muses, which was one of the first mode” >

    Liked by 1 person

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